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W. S. Gilbert: Quiz

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Question 1: Gilbert also wrote two serious works during this time, ________ (1875) and Dan'l Druce, Blacksmith (1876).
Trial by JuryBroken HeartsGilbert and SullivanW. S. Gilbert

Question 2: What does the following picture show?

  Caricature from Punch, 1881
  Lithograph from The Mikado
  Scene from The Happy Land, from The Illustrated London News of March 22, 1873, illustrated by D. H. Friston
  Gilbert and his wife, Lucy, in 1867

Question 3: As ________ vividly described it, "stilted tragedy and vulgar farce were all the would-be playgoer had to choose from, and the theatre had become a place of evil repute to the righteous British householder."[25]
Rutland BarringtonJessie BondGilbert and SullivanD'Oyly Carte Opera Company

Question 4: [90] Also, according to ________, Gilbert loved children:
Trial by JuryW. S. GilbertGeorge GrossmithD'Oyly Carte Opera Company

Question 5:
W. S. Gilbert, Gustav Mahler and Francis Galton are all:
English poets Deaths by drowning 1911 deaths Knights Bachelor

Question 6: [68] In 1891, Gilbert was appointed ________ for Middlesex.
SolicitorJudicial Committee of the Privy CouncilJustice of the peaceMagistrates' Court

Question 7: What does the following picture show?

  "The Ironmaster at the Savoy" (1884): Gilbert with the mallet of discipline; Carte reacts
  Illustration of Thespis in The Illustrated London News, 6 January 1872
  Gilbert reworked his 1870 farce, The Princess, illustrated here, into Princess Ida (1884).
  One of Gilbert's illustrations for his Bab Ballad "Gentle Alice Brown"

Question 8:
W. S. Gilbert, RMS Titanic and Natalie Wood are all:
Alumni of King%27s College London Deputy Lieutenants of Middlesex Knights Bachelor Deaths by drowning

Question 9: His plays and realistic style of stage direction inspired other dramatists, including Oscar Wilde and ________.
Pygmalion (play)George Bernard ShawRudyard KiplingH. G. Wells

Question 10: What does the following picture show?

  Engaged (1877) was Gilbert's most successful non-musical play
  Caricature from Punch, 1881
  Gilbert reworked his 1870 farce, The Princess, illustrated here, into Princess Ida (1884).
  Gilbert and his wife, Lucy, in 1867







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