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Spectral line: Quiz

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Question 1: Spectral lines are highly atom-specific, and can be used to identify the chemical composition of any medium capable of letting light pass through it (typically ________ is used).
Specific heat capacityTemperatureThermodynamic temperatureGas

Question 2: When a photon has about the right amount of energy to allow a change in the energy state of the system (in the case of an atom this is usually an ________ changing orbitals), the photon is absorbed.
NeutrinoPositronQuarkElectron

Question 3: Spectral lines are the result of interaction between a quantum system (usually atoms, but sometimes ________ or atomic nuclei) and a single photon.
ElectronMoleculeMatterNeutron

Question 4: This effect depends on both the ________ and the temperature of the gas.
DensityCopperIronGold

Question 5: Spectral lines also depend on the physical conditions of the gas, so they are widely used to determine the chemical composition of ________ and other celestial bodies that cannot be analyzed by other means, as well as their physical conditions.
SupernovaStellar classificationStarBinary star

Question 6: Neutral atoms are denoted with the roman number I, singly ionized atoms with II, and so on, so that for example FeIX represents eight times (IX, roman 9) ionized ________.
IronZincOxygenChromium

Question 7: Van der Waals broadening occurs when the emitting particle is being perturbed by ________.
Chemical bondLondon dispersion forceVan der Waals forceStacking (chemistry)

Question 8: Macroscopic Doppler broadening: Radiation emitted by a moving source is a subject to the ________ due to a finite line-of-sight velocity projection.
RedshiftDoppler effectStarAstronomy

Question 9: This effect depends on the ________ of the gas, but is rather insensitive to temperature.
CopperIronGoldDensity

Question 10: Natural broadening: The ________ relates the lifetime of an excited state (due to the spontaneous radiative decay or the Auger process) with the uncertainty of its energy.
Introduction to quantum mechanicsUncertainty principleWave–particle dualityQuantum mechanics







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