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Ritual washing in Judaism: Quiz

  
  

Question 1: It is customary for ________ to pour the water over the hands of the Kohanim and to assist them in other ways.
LeviteMosesIsraelitesTorah

Question 2: [37][38] Although Christianity did not adopt the requirement for priests to wash feet before worship, in ________ the practice was extended to the congregation and expanded into wudu.
Islamic schools and branchesMosqueMuslim historyIslam

Question 3: The Talmud ascribes to the Great Assembly of ________ a Rabbinic decree imposing further restrictions on men ritually impure from a seminal discharge, including a prohibition on studying Torah and from participating in services.
UzairJudaismEzraBible

Question 4: Since the decree of ________, observance of the rules of Qeri and hence regular Mikwah use by men fell into disuse in many communities.
SoulMaimonidesThomas AquinasAverroes

Question 5: After having gone to the bathroom (and having either ________ or defecated), the ritual washing of one's hands as a symbol of both bodily cleanliness and of removing human impurity - see Netilat yadayim above.
PenisBenign prostatic hyperplasiaUrinary incontinenceUrination

Question 6: [31] The ________ states that the High Priest had to immerse himself five times, and his hands and feet had to be washed ten times.
MishnahToseftaTalmudMinor tractate

Question 7: The rabbis of the Talmud derived the requirement of washing the hands as a consequence of the statement in ________ 15:11
Book of NumbersBook of DeuteronomyPsalmsBook of Leviticus

Question 8: Judaism traditionally traces this requirement to the ________:
TorahBibleIslam and JudaismKabbalah

Question 9: The first written records for these practices are found in the ________, and are elaborated in the Mishnah and Talmud.
Hebrew BibleOld TestamentDeuterocanonical booksTanakh

Question 10: R' ________ in Waters of Life connects the laws of impurity to the narrative in the beginning of Genesis.
Hasidic JudaismAryeh KaplanKabbalahJewish services
















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