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Litre: Quiz

  
  
  

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Question 1: There are two official symbols: the ________ letter L in lower and upper case (l and L).
LatinVulgar LatinRoman EmpireOld Latin

Question 2: The United States National Institute of Standards and Technology now recommends the use of the uppercase letter L, a practice that is also widely followed in Canada and ________.
AustraliaUnited KingdomBarbadosJamaica

Question 3: In 1795, the litre was introduced in ________ as one of the new "Republican Measures", and defined as one cubic decimetre.
United KingdomItalyFranceCanada

Question 4: Nevertheless, it is no longer used in most countries and was never officially recognised by the BIPM or the ________, and is a character often not available in currently-used documentation systems.
International Organization for StandardizationISO 3166ISO 3166-1OpenDocument

Question 5: The original French ________ used the litre as a base unit.
United States customary unitsImperial unitsGlobal Positioning SystemMetric system

Question 6: The lower case L is also often written as a ________ , though this symbol has no official approval by any international bureau.
Latin alphabetCalligraphyCursivePenmanship

Question 7: Originally, the only symbol for the litre was l (lowercase letter L), following the ________ convention that only those unit symbols that abbreviate the name of a person start with a capital letter.
Conversion of unitsMetric systemSystems of measurementInternational System of Units

Question 8: Although the litre is not an SI unit, it is accepted for use with the SI,[1] and has appeared in several versions of the ________.
Imperial unitsUnited States customary unitsGlobal Positioning SystemMetric system

Question 9: The litre, though not an official SI unit, may be used with ________.
Engineering notationGiga-SI prefixMega-

Question 10: However, some authorities advise against some of them (for example, in the United States, ________ advocates using the millilitre or litre instead of the centilitre[3]).
Bureau of Industry and SecurityNational Technical Information ServiceNational Institute of Standards and TechnologyNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
















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