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Linear perspective: Quiz

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Question 1: What does the following picture show?

  A cube in two-point perspective.
  Rays of light travel from the object, through the picture plane, and to the viewer's eye. This is the basis for graphical perspective.
  Perspective study of a vase by Paolo Uccello (Galleria degli Uffizi, Gabinetto dei Disegni)
  15th century illustration from the Old French translation of William of Tyre's Histoire d'Outremer. There is clearly a general attempt to reduce the size of more distant elements, but unsystematically. Sections of the composition are at a similar scale, with relative distance shown by overlapping, foreshortening, and further objects being higher than nearer ones, though the workmen at left do show finer adjustment of size. But this is abandoned on the right where the most important figure is much larger than the mason. Rectangular buildings, and the blocks of stone are shown obliquely.

Question 2: What does the following picture show?

  Rays of light travel from the object, through the picture plane, and to the viewer's eye. This is the basis for graphical perspective.
  Pietro Perugino's usage of perspective in this fresco at the Sistine Chapel (148182) helped bring the Renaissance to Rome.

Question 3: What does the following picture show?

  Geometrically incorrect attempt at perspective in a 1614 painting of Old St Paul's Cathedral. (Society of Antiquaries)
  The rays of light drawn on the picture itself. The grey line on the left represents the picture plane. Where the blue line intersects with this line, which is also the side of the red square, the back of the square is drawn.
  Geometrically incorrect attempt at perspective in a 1614 painting of Old St Paul's Cathedral. (Society of Antiquaries)
  15th century illustration from the Old French translation of William of Tyre's Histoire d'Outremer. There is clearly a general attempt to reduce the size of more distant elements, but unsystematically. Sections of the composition are at a similar scale, with relative distance shown by overlapping, foreshortening, and further objects being higher than nearer ones, though the workmen at left do show finer adjustment of size. But this is abandoned on the right where the most important figure is much larger than the mason. Rectangular buildings, and the blocks of stone are shown obliquely.

Question 4: What does the following picture show?

  A cube in two-point perspective.
  Rays of light travel from the object, through the picture plane, and to the viewer's eye. This is the basis for graphical perspective.
  Perspective study of a vase by Paolo Uccello (Galleria degli Uffizi, Gabinetto dei Disegni)

Question 5: What does the following picture show?

  Rays of light travel from the object, through the picture plane, and to the viewer's eye. This is the basis for graphical perspective.
  Staircase perspective.
  A cube in two-point perspective.
  Melozzo's usage of "down to up" perspective in his frescoes at Loreto.

Question 6: What does the following picture show?

  15th century illustration from the Old French translation of William of Tyre's Histoire d'Outremer. There is clearly a general attempt to reduce the size of more distant elements, but unsystematically. Sections of the composition are at a similar scale, with relative distance shown by overlapping, foreshortening, and further objects being higher than nearer ones, though the workmen at left do show finer adjustment of size. But this is abandoned on the right where the most important figure is much larger than the mason. Rectangular buildings, and the blocks of stone are shown obliquely.
  The rays of light drawn on the picture itself. The grey line on the left represents the picture plane. Where the blue line intersects with this line, which is also the side of the red square, the back of the square is drawn.
  The rays of light drawn on the picture itself. The grey line on the left represents the picture plane. Where the blue line intersects with this line, which is also the side of the red square, the back of the square is drawn.
  Geometrically incorrect attempt at perspective in a 1614 painting of Old St Paul's Cathedral. (Society of Antiquaries)

Question 7: What does the following picture show?

  Rays of light travel from the object, through the picture plane, and to the viewer's eye. This is the basis for graphical perspective.
  Rays of light travel from the object, through the picture plane, and to the viewer's eye. This is the basis for graphical perspective.
  15th century illustration from the Old French translation of William of Tyre's Histoire d'Outremer. There is clearly a general attempt to reduce the size of more distant elements, but unsystematically. Sections of the composition are at a similar scale, with relative distance shown by overlapping, foreshortening, and further objects being higher than nearer ones, though the workmen at left do show finer adjustment of size. But this is abandoned on the right where the most important figure is much larger than the mason. Rectangular buildings, and the blocks of stone are shown obliquely.
  Geometrically incorrect attempt at perspective in a 1614 painting of Old St Paul's Cathedral. (Society of Antiquaries)

Question 8: What does the following picture show?

  Rays of light travel from the object, through the picture plane, and to the viewer's eye. This is the basis for graphical perspective.
  Staircase perspective.

Question 9: What does the following picture show?

  A: No perspective foreshortening, and B: Perspective foreshortening
  A: No perspective foreshortening, and B: Perspective foreshortening
  Geometrically incorrect attempt at perspective in a 1614 painting of Old St Paul's Cathedral. (Society of Antiquaries)
  Melozzo's usage of "down to up" perspective in his frescoes at Loreto.







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