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Lady: Quiz

  
  

Question 1: This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the ________.
Copyright infringementCopyrightIntellectual propertyPublic domain

Question 2: Non-sexist language guidelines forbid its use to refer attributively to the sex of a working person, as in lady ________ and lady doctor.
ShariaCommon lawLegal educationLawyer

Question 3: "Ladies" is also the normal text on the signs to any female ________ in a public place in the UK, again paired with "Gentlemen" (or "Gents").
BidetUrinal (restroom)ToiletFlush toilet

Question 4: These social class issues, while no longer on the front burner in the twenty-first century, have imbued the formal use of "lady" with something of an odour of ________ (e.g: "my cleaning lady").
Literary techniqueSelf-fulfilling prophecyIronyGreek mythology

Question 5: The special use of the word as a title of the Virgin Mary, usually Our Lady, represents the ________ Domina Nostra.
Vulgar LatinRoman EmpireLatinOld Latin

Question 6: "Lady" is also the customary title of the wife of a ________ or knight, but in this case with neither the article nor Christian name: "Lady" with the surname of the husband only, Sir John and Lady Smith.
BaronetDame (title)Hereditary peerHer Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council

Question 7: It is thus a less formal alternative to the full title giving the specific rank, of marchioness, ________, viscountess or baroness, whether as the title of the husband's rank by right or courtesy, or as the lady's title in her own right.
CountMargraveMarquessRoyal and noble ranks

Question 8: In the case of younger sons of a ________ or marquess, who by courtesy have "Lord" prefixed to their given and family name, the wife is known by the husband's given and family name with "The Lady" prefixed, e.g.
BaronCountPrinceDuke

Question 9: The word comes from Old English hlǣfdige; the first part of the word is a mutated form of hlāf, "loaf, ________", also seen in the corresponding hlāford, "lord".
RiceBreakfastMedieval cuisineBread

Question 10: A lady is the female equivalent of a lord, the counterpart of a ________, or any adult woman, though this usage is constrained.
GentryGentlemanEnglandYeoman
















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