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Galliformes: Quiz

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Question 1: As it seems, the turkeys became huge after their ancestors colonized temperate and subtropical ________ where pheasant-sized competitors were absent.
South AmericaAmericasAmericas (terminology)North America

Question 2: There are a number of prehistorically extinct mound-builders from ________ islands, and these seem to have arrived at flightlessness in the more conventional way.
Atlantic OceanPacific OceanIndian OceanArctic Ocean

Question 3: Indeed, there exist a few fragmentary fossils of putative galliforms from the ________, of which the most interesting fossil taxon is Austinornis.
CretaceousCretaceous–Tertiary extinction eventDinosaurGeologic time scale

Question 4: The relationships of many pheasants and partridges are still very badly resolved and much confounded by adaptive radiation (in the former) and ________ (in the latter).
CountershadingBirdConvergent evolutionParallel evolution

Question 5: Most galliform ________ are plump-bodied with thick necks and moderately long legs, and have rounded and rather short wings.
GenusLifeSpeciesBiological classification

Question 6: Given that the oldest known waterfowl, Vegavis iaai, dates from the ________, galliform ancestors must also have roamed the Earth contemporaneously with animals such as Tyrannosaurus rex.
Late CretaceousCretaceous–Tertiary extinction eventMaastrichtianGeologic time scale

Question 7: Consequently the Phasianidae are expanded in current treatments to include the former Tetraonidae and ________ as subfamilies.
RaccoonOpossumDomestic turkeyTurkey (bird)

Question 8: Subfamily Pavoninae – ________ and ocellated pheasants
PeafowlPhasianidaeIndian PeafowlBird

Question 9: There they are known to forage on slugs, snails, ants and ________ to the exclusion of plant material.
AmphibianBirdReptileChordate

Question 10: The Paleogene had several galliforms of now-________ families, namely the Gallinuloididae, Paraortygidae and Quercymegapodiidae.
Holocene extinctionConservation biologyEvolutionExtinction







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