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Explosive material: Quiz

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Question 1: Chemical explosives are substances that contain a large amount of energy stored in ________.
Covalent bondAromaticityChemical bondHydrogen bond

Question 2: A chemical explosive may consist of either a chemically pure compound, such as nitroglycerin, or a mixture of an fuel and a oxidizer, such as ________ or grain dust and air.
CannonEnglandGunpowderEarly Modern warfare

Question 3: As a very general rule, primary explosives are considered to be those compounds that are more sensitive than ________.
Pentaerythritol tetranitrateMolsidomineGlyceryl trinitrate (pharmacology)Vasodilation

Question 4: Examples include nuclear explosives, ________, and abruptly heating a substance to a plasma state with a high-intensity laser or electric arc.
ElectronAntimatterAntiprotonNuclear fusion

Question 5: Included in this group are gun powders and light pyrotechnics, such as flares and ________.
United StatesFireworksConsumer fireworksHawaii

Question 6: Regarding an explosive, this refers to the ease with which it can be ignited or detonated—i.e., the amount and intensity of shock, ________, or heat that is required.
Lift (force)Drag (physics)ForceFriction

Question 7: An explosive material, also called an explosive, is a substance that contains a great amount of stored energy that can produce an ________, a sudden expansion of the material after initiation, usually accompanied by the production of light, heat, and pressure.
SupernovaExplosionStarSun

Question 8: ________: A highly unstable and sensitive liquid.
Pentaerythritol tetranitrateNitroglycerinCorditeErythritol tetranitrate

Question 9: An oxidizer is a pure substance (molecule) that in a chemical reaction can contribute some atoms of one or more oxidizing elements, in which the ________ component of the explosive burns.
EnergyHydrogenCoalFuel

Question 10: ________, such as nitroglycerine or grain dust
Chemical thermodynamicsEntropyThermodynamic free energyThermodynamics







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