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Aristotelian physics: Quiz

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  • Aristotle's ideas of physics held that because an object could not move without an immediate source of energy, arrows created a vacuum behind them that pushed them through the air?

More interesting facts on Aristotelian physics

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Question 1:
The Greek philosopher ________ (384 BC – 322 BC) developed many theories on the nature of physics.
AristotleEmpiricismPlatoBertrand Russell

Question 2: Aristotle taught that the elements that composed the ________ were different from those that made up the heavens and Outer space.
NatureSunEarthMoon

Question 3: [11] Like Newton, he described acceleration as the rate of change of ________.
SpeedKinematicsVelocityClassical mechanics

Question 4: Using a ________, Galileo observed that the moon was not entirely smooth, but had craters and mountains, contradicting the Aristotelian idea of an incorruptible perfectly smooth moon.
Reflecting telescopeOptical telescopeTelescopeAstronomy

Question 5: During the Middle Ages, the Aristotelian theory of gravity was first criticized and/or modified by ________ and later by Muslim physicists.
Orthodox ChurchTrinityAristotleJohn Philoponus

Question 6: In the 14th century, Jean Buridan developed the theory of impetus, based on ________'s theory of mayl and the work of John Philoponus, as an alternative to the Aristotelian theory of motion.
EmpiricismAvicennaAristotleScholasticism

Question 7: Aristotle believed that there were four main elements or compounds that made up the ________: earth, air, water and fire.
SunEarthNatureMoon

Question 8: In Europe, ________'s theory was first convincingly discredited by the work of Galileo Galilei.
AristotleEmpiricismPlatoBertrand Russell

Question 9: The speed of this motion was thought to be proportional to the ________ of the object.
MassForceClassical mechanicsGeneral relativity

Question 10: [7] Abū Rayhān al-Bīrūnī (973-1048) was the first to realize that ________ is connected with non-uniform motion, part of Newton's second law of motion.
AccelerationForceKinematicsSpeed







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