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Question 1: What does the following picture show?

  While this "Confederate Flag" pattern is the one most often thought of as the "Confederate Flag" today, it was actually only one of many used by the Confederate armed forces. This design served as the Battle Flag of the Army of Tennessee, and as the Confederate Naval Jack.
  Confederate dead of General Ewell's Corps who attacked the Union lines at the Battle of Spotsylvania, May 19, 1864.

Question 2: What does the following picture show?

  Confederate dead of General Ewell's Corps who attacked the Union lines at the Battle of Spotsylvania, May 19, 1864.
  While this "Confederate Flag" pattern is the one most often thought of as the "Confederate Flag" today, it was actually only one of many used by the Confederate armed forces. This design served as the Battle Flag of the Army of Tennessee, and as the Confederate Naval Jack.
  While this "Confederate Flag" pattern is the one most often thought of as the "Confederate Flag" today, it was actually only one of many used by the Confederate armed forces. This design served as the Battle Flag of the Army of Tennessee, and as the Confederate Naval Jack.
  Historic Southern United States. The states in red were in the Confederacy and have historically been regarded as forming "the South." Those in stripes were considered "Border" states, and gave varying degrees of support to the Southern cause although they remained in the Union. (This image depicts the original, trans-Allegheny borders of Virginia, and so does not show West Virginia separately. See image below for post-1863 Virginia and West Virginia borders.) While Oklahoma was aligned with the Confederacy, it is not shaded because at the time, the region was Indian Territory, and thus not a state.

Question 3: What does the following picture show?

  Historic Southern United States. The states in red were in the Confederacy and have historically been regarded as forming "the South." Those in stripes were considered "Border" states, and gave varying degrees of support to the Southern cause although they remained in the Union. (This image depicts the original, trans-Allegheny borders of Virginia, and so does not show West Virginia separately. See image below for post-1863 Virginia and West Virginia borders.) While Oklahoma was aligned with the Confederacy, it is not shaded because at the time, the region was Indian Territory, and thus not a state.
  Historic Southern United States. The states in red were in the Confederacy and have historically been regarded as forming "the South." Those in stripes were considered "Border" states, and gave varying degrees of support to the Southern cause although they remained in the Union. (This image depicts the original, trans-Allegheny borders of Virginia, and so does not show West Virginia separately. See image below for post-1863 Virginia and West Virginia borders.) While Oklahoma was aligned with the Confederacy, it is not shaded because at the time, the region was Indian Territory, and thus not a state.
  Modern definition The states in dark red are almost always included in modern day definitions of the South, while those in medium red are usually included. Some sources classify Maryland and Missouri as Southern, with Delaware only rarely grouped within the region. West Virginia is often considered Southern, because it was once part of Virginia.[1][2][3]
  The South is one of four Census Bureau Regions.

Question 4: What does the following picture show?

  Confederate dead of General Ewell's Corps who attacked the Union lines at the Battle of Spotsylvania, May 19, 1864.
  While this "Confederate Flag" pattern is the one most often thought of as the "Confederate Flag" today, it was actually only one of many used by the Confederate armed forces. This design served as the Battle Flag of the Army of Tennessee, and as the Confederate Naval Jack.
  Modern definition The states in dark red are almost always included in modern day definitions of the South, while those in medium red are usually included. Some sources classify Maryland and Missouri as Southern, with Delaware only rarely grouped within the region. West Virginia is often considered Southern, because it was once part of Virginia.[1][2][3]

Question 5: What does the following picture show?

  Historic Southern United States. The states in red were in the Confederacy and have historically been regarded as forming "the South." Those in stripes were considered "Border" states, and gave varying degrees of support to the Southern cause although they remained in the Union. (This image depicts the original, trans-Allegheny borders of Virginia, and so does not show West Virginia separately. See image below for post-1863 Virginia and West Virginia borders.) While Oklahoma was aligned with the Confederacy, it is not shaded because at the time, the region was Indian Territory, and thus not a state.
  The South is one of four Census Bureau Regions.
  The South is one of four Census Bureau Regions.
  The South is one of four Census Bureau Regions.

Question 6: What does the following picture show?

  United States areas of the Arctic Watershed are in northern Alaska, Minnesota, and North Dakota.
  While this "Confederate Flag" pattern is the one most often thought of as the "Confederate Flag" today, it was actually only one of many used by the Confederate armed forces. This design served as the Battle Flag of the Army of Tennessee, and as the Confederate Naval Jack.
  The South is one of four Census Bureau Regions.
  Confederate dead of General Ewell's Corps who attacked the Union lines at the Battle of Spotsylvania, May 19, 1864.
















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